Family factors and HIV-related risk behaviors among adolescent sexual minority males in three United States Cities, 2015

NHBS-YMSM Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: We examined the relationship between family factors and HIV-related sexual risk behaviors among adolescent sexual minority males (ASMM) who are affected disproportionately by HIV. Methods: We analyzed results from the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men. Adolescent males ages 13-18 who identified as gay or bisexual, or who reported attraction to or sex with males were interviewed in 2015 in Chicago, New York City, and Philadelphia. Separate log-linked Poisson regression models were used to estimate associations between family factors and sexual risk behaviors. Results: Of the 569 ASMM, 41% had condomless anal intercourse in the past 12 months, 38% had ‡4 male sex partners in the past 12 months, and 23% had vaginal or anal sex before age 13. ASMM who had ever been kicked out of their house or run away, those who were out to their mother, and those who were out to their father, were more likely to engage in sexual risk behaviors. ASMM who were currently living with parents or guardians and those who received a positive reaction to their outness by their mother were less likely to engage in sexual risk behaviors. Conclusion: Our findings highlight the important role of family factors in HIV risk reduction among ASMM. A better understanding of the complex dynamics of these families will help in developing family-based interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-374
Number of pages8
JournalLGBT Health
Volume7
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Adolescent sexual minority males
  • Family factors
  • HIV risk
  • YMSM

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Urology

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