Family history of sudden cardiac death of the young: Prevalence and associated factors

Michelle J. White*, Debra Duquette, Janice Bach, Ann P. Rafferty, Chris Fussman, Ruta Sharangpani, Mark W. Russell

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sudden cardiac death of the young (SCDY) is a devastating event for families and communities. Family history is a significant risk factor for this potentially preventable cause of death, however a complete and detailed family history is not commonly obtained during routine health maintenance visits. To estimate the proportion of adults with a family history of SCDY, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) Genomics Program included two questions within the 2007 Michigan Behavioral Risk Factor Survey (MiBRFS). Prevalence estimates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Among adults in Michigan, 6.3% reported a family history of SCDY, with a greater prevalence among blacks, those with lower household income, and those with less education. Among those reporting a family history of SCDY, 42.3% had at least one first-degree relative and 26.2% had multiple affected family members. This is the first study to demonstrate the prevalence of family history of SCDY while also highlighting key sociodemographic characteristics associated with increased prevalence. These findings should guide evidence-based interventions to reach those at greatest risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1086-1096
Number of pages11
JournalHealthcare (Switzerland)
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Family history
  • Genomics
  • Health disparities
  • Sudden cardiac death

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Health Policy
  • Health Information Management
  • Leadership and Management

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