Family interaction among white and ethnic minority adolescents with bulimia nervosa and their parents

Renee Rienecke Hoste*, Kristen Hewell, Daniel le Grange

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To examine family adaptability, cohesion and satisfaction among white and ethnic minority families of adolescents seeking treatment for BN. Method: Families completed the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales (FACES 111) as part of their baseline assessment. Results: No differences were found between white and ethnic minority patients' perceived and ideal levels of family cohesion and adaptability or level of satisfaction with family functioning, nor were differences found between white and ethnic minority parents on these measures. Both white and ethnic minority patients perceived their families to be less cohesive than did their fathers and their mothers, and their ideal levels of cohesion were lower than that of their fathers and their mothers. Conclusion: These findings are consistent with a growing literature on eating disorders among ethnic minorities, which suggests that there may be fewer differences and more similarities among ethnic groups than previously thought.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)152-158
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Eating Disorders Review
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Bulimia nervosa
  • Eating disorders
  • Ethnic minority
  • Family

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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