"Family values" and political persuasion: Impact of kin-related rhetoric on reactions to political campaigns

Jennifer Garst*, Galen V. Bodenhausen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Within the framework of dual-process models of persuasion, it was hypothesized that including references to kin in a persuasive speech might either (a) promote greater scrutiny of the message by making it seem more value-relevant, or (b) serve as a simple peripheral cue of value congruence. Republicans, Democrats, and Independents read a political speech that varied by argument quality (strong/weak), kin terms (absent/present), and the speaker's party affiliation. Results indicated that Democrats scrutinized the message more when kin terms were used, whereas such terms appeared to discourage message elaboration on the part of Republican participants, but only when used by an in-group member. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for the efficacy of political rhetoric using kin terms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1119-1137
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume26
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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