Feasibility of laser surface texturing for friction reduction in surgical blades

Tim Velasquez, Peidong Han, Jian Cao, Kornel Ehmann

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Trauma resulting from surgical blade friction can cause several complications and delay the recovery time of a patient. In order to attain optimal tribological properties, an 8 ps pulsed 532 nm Nd:YVO4 laser was used to ablate the cutting edge surface of surgical blades to create micro dimples of ∼110 μm in diameter and ∼30 μm in depth. Additionally, certain arrays of dimples endured an extra laser ablation operation to add a fillet to the dimple rims with the hope of reducing stress concentrations during tissue cutting and reducing friction even further. These surface textures were experimentally investigated through cutting experiments on phantom tissue material. Ultimately, the blades with the cutting surface texture that employed blended dimple rims showed a substantial reduction in friction forces when cutting phantom tissue samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASME 2013 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference Collocated with the 41st North American Manufacturing Research Conference, MSEC 2013
Volume1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 18 2013
EventASME 2013 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference Collocated with the 41st North American Manufacturing Research Conference, MSEC 2013 - Madison, WI, United States
Duration: Jun 10 2013Jun 14 2013

Other

OtherASME 2013 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference Collocated with the 41st North American Manufacturing Research Conference, MSEC 2013
CountryUnited States
CityMadison, WI
Period6/10/136/14/13

Keywords

  • Friction
  • Laser surface texturing
  • Surgical blades

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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