Feasibility of nerve-sparing prostate cryosurgery: Applications and limitations in a canine model

Nicolette K. Janzen, Ken Ryu Han, Kent T. Perry, Jonathan W. Said, Peter G. Schulam, Arie S. Belldegrun*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Purpose: In a canine model, we evaluated the feasibility of nerve-sparing cryosurgery by active warming of the neurovascular bundle (NVB). Furthermore, our aim was to determine if NVB warming increases the risk of acinar gland and stromal-tissue preservation in adjacent areas of the prostate. The effects of a single versus double freeze-thaw cycle on prostate tissue were also assessed. Materials and Methods: Ten prostate lobes from five dogs were evaluated. Nine lobes from five dogs were treated with cryoablation using 17-gauge gas-driven cryoneedles. Seven lobes wre treated with active warming of the NVB using helium gas, and two lobes were treated without active warming. A single or double freeze-thaw cycle was utilized. Prostate tissue ablation and NVB preservation were evaluated in histologic sections. Results: All seven prostate lobes treated with active warming demonstrated complete or partial NVB preservation. Four of these lobes had adjacent gland preservation. All lobes treated with a double freeze-thaw cycle showed complete and uniform ablation of prostate tissue. One of the three lobes treated with a single freeze-thaw cycle demonstrated incomplete ablation of the tissue. Conclusions: This is the first study investigating the feasibility of NVB preservation under controlled experimental conditions. In our canine model, NVB preservation with active warming was possible but not consistently reproducible. In some cases, NVB preservation with active warming may result in incomplete peripheral tissue ablation. A double, but not a single, freeze-thaw cycle induces complete and effective necrosis of prostatic tissue. These results have significant clinical applications when attempting nerve-sparing cryosurgical ablation of the prostate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)520-525
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Endourology
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2005

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Cryosurgery
Canidae
Prostate
Gases
Dogs
Tissue Preservation
Helium
Feasibility Studies
Necrosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Janzen, Nicolette K. ; Han, Ken Ryu ; Perry, Kent T. ; Said, Jonathan W. ; Schulam, Peter G. ; Belldegrun, Arie S. / Feasibility of nerve-sparing prostate cryosurgery : Applications and limitations in a canine model. In: Journal of Endourology. 2005 ; Vol. 19, No. 4. pp. 520-525.
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abstract = "Background and Purpose: In a canine model, we evaluated the feasibility of nerve-sparing cryosurgery by active warming of the neurovascular bundle (NVB). Furthermore, our aim was to determine if NVB warming increases the risk of acinar gland and stromal-tissue preservation in adjacent areas of the prostate. The effects of a single versus double freeze-thaw cycle on prostate tissue were also assessed. Materials and Methods: Ten prostate lobes from five dogs were evaluated. Nine lobes from five dogs were treated with cryoablation using 17-gauge gas-driven cryoneedles. Seven lobes wre treated with active warming of the NVB using helium gas, and two lobes were treated without active warming. A single or double freeze-thaw cycle was utilized. Prostate tissue ablation and NVB preservation were evaluated in histologic sections. Results: All seven prostate lobes treated with active warming demonstrated complete or partial NVB preservation. Four of these lobes had adjacent gland preservation. All lobes treated with a double freeze-thaw cycle showed complete and uniform ablation of prostate tissue. One of the three lobes treated with a single freeze-thaw cycle demonstrated incomplete ablation of the tissue. Conclusions: This is the first study investigating the feasibility of NVB preservation under controlled experimental conditions. In our canine model, NVB preservation with active warming was possible but not consistently reproducible. In some cases, NVB preservation with active warming may result in incomplete peripheral tissue ablation. A double, but not a single, freeze-thaw cycle induces complete and effective necrosis of prostatic tissue. These results have significant clinical applications when attempting nerve-sparing cryosurgical ablation of the prostate.",
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Feasibility of nerve-sparing prostate cryosurgery : Applications and limitations in a canine model. / Janzen, Nicolette K.; Han, Ken Ryu; Perry, Kent T.; Said, Jonathan W.; Schulam, Peter G.; Belldegrun, Arie S.

In: Journal of Endourology, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.05.2005, p. 520-525.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Feasibility of nerve-sparing prostate cryosurgery

T2 - Applications and limitations in a canine model

AU - Janzen, Nicolette K.

AU - Han, Ken Ryu

AU - Perry, Kent T.

AU - Said, Jonathan W.

AU - Schulam, Peter G.

AU - Belldegrun, Arie S.

PY - 2005/5/1

Y1 - 2005/5/1

N2 - Background and Purpose: In a canine model, we evaluated the feasibility of nerve-sparing cryosurgery by active warming of the neurovascular bundle (NVB). Furthermore, our aim was to determine if NVB warming increases the risk of acinar gland and stromal-tissue preservation in adjacent areas of the prostate. The effects of a single versus double freeze-thaw cycle on prostate tissue were also assessed. Materials and Methods: Ten prostate lobes from five dogs were evaluated. Nine lobes from five dogs were treated with cryoablation using 17-gauge gas-driven cryoneedles. Seven lobes wre treated with active warming of the NVB using helium gas, and two lobes were treated without active warming. A single or double freeze-thaw cycle was utilized. Prostate tissue ablation and NVB preservation were evaluated in histologic sections. Results: All seven prostate lobes treated with active warming demonstrated complete or partial NVB preservation. Four of these lobes had adjacent gland preservation. All lobes treated with a double freeze-thaw cycle showed complete and uniform ablation of prostate tissue. One of the three lobes treated with a single freeze-thaw cycle demonstrated incomplete ablation of the tissue. Conclusions: This is the first study investigating the feasibility of NVB preservation under controlled experimental conditions. In our canine model, NVB preservation with active warming was possible but not consistently reproducible. In some cases, NVB preservation with active warming may result in incomplete peripheral tissue ablation. A double, but not a single, freeze-thaw cycle induces complete and effective necrosis of prostatic tissue. These results have significant clinical applications when attempting nerve-sparing cryosurgical ablation of the prostate.

AB - Background and Purpose: In a canine model, we evaluated the feasibility of nerve-sparing cryosurgery by active warming of the neurovascular bundle (NVB). Furthermore, our aim was to determine if NVB warming increases the risk of acinar gland and stromal-tissue preservation in adjacent areas of the prostate. The effects of a single versus double freeze-thaw cycle on prostate tissue were also assessed. Materials and Methods: Ten prostate lobes from five dogs were evaluated. Nine lobes from five dogs were treated with cryoablation using 17-gauge gas-driven cryoneedles. Seven lobes wre treated with active warming of the NVB using helium gas, and two lobes were treated without active warming. A single or double freeze-thaw cycle was utilized. Prostate tissue ablation and NVB preservation were evaluated in histologic sections. Results: All seven prostate lobes treated with active warming demonstrated complete or partial NVB preservation. Four of these lobes had adjacent gland preservation. All lobes treated with a double freeze-thaw cycle showed complete and uniform ablation of prostate tissue. One of the three lobes treated with a single freeze-thaw cycle demonstrated incomplete ablation of the tissue. Conclusions: This is the first study investigating the feasibility of NVB preservation under controlled experimental conditions. In our canine model, NVB preservation with active warming was possible but not consistently reproducible. In some cases, NVB preservation with active warming may result in incomplete peripheral tissue ablation. A double, but not a single, freeze-thaw cycle induces complete and effective necrosis of prostatic tissue. These results have significant clinical applications when attempting nerve-sparing cryosurgical ablation of the prostate.

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