Fetal bladder sagittal length

A simple monitor to assess normal and enlarged fetal bladder size, and forecast clinical outcome

Max Maizels*, Seth A. Alpert, John T.B. Houston, Rudy E. Sabbagha, Barbara V. Parilla, Scott N. MacGregor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We examined if the parameter of fetal bladder sagittal length (FBSL) could serve as a monitor of normative and enlarged fetal bladder size. Materials and Methods: There were 76 consecutive cases examined between 1984 and 2000 that included measurement of fetal bladder size as FBSL and postnatal urological followup. Fetal images used to assess normal bladder size were derived from cases in which the bladder was normal on prenatal imaging and postnatal testing. An enlarged bladder was categorized as being greater than the 95% CI for a given gestational age (GA). The presence and extent of renal pelvic dilatation were also noted and correlated with FBSL. Results: Measuring normal FBSL in 39 fetuses showed an exponential growth pattern (r = 0.76), which could be represented by the approximate linear formula FBSL = GA in weeks -5 (±95% upper/lower CI = 7). An enlarged bladder was diagnosed in 37 fetuses. A dilated bladder in 9 fetuses, defined as FBSL greater than the 95% upper CI of normal (ie between GA + 2 and GA + 12), showed outcomes of posterior urethral valves, vesicoureteral reflux or a normal outcome. Megacystis in 28 fetuses, defined as FBSL greater than 10 mm larger than that of a dilated bladder (ie greater than GA + 12), showed additional outcomes of megacystis megaureter/vesicoureteral reflux or prune-belly syndrome. A normal outcome was significantly more likely in fetuses with a dilated bladder than in those with megacystis (p ≤0.05). The incidence of azotemia in those with a dilated bladder or megacystis and pyelectasis was significantly lower than that in those with megacystis with hydronephrosis (p ≤0.03). Conclusions: Postnatal diagnosis of fetuses that show an enlarged bladder is predicted based on whether the bladder is enlarged as a dilated bladder or megacystis and if the renal pelvis is enlarged as pyelectasis or hydronephrosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1995-1999
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume172
Issue number5 I
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

Urinary Bladder
Fetus
Gestational Age
Pyelectasis
Vesico-Ureteral Reflux
Hydronephrosis
Prune Belly Syndrome
Azotemia
Kidney Pelvis
Megaduodenum
Dilatation

Keywords

  • Abnormalities
  • Bladder
  • Fetus
  • Kidney
  • Ultrasonography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Maizels, Max ; Alpert, Seth A. ; Houston, John T.B. ; Sabbagha, Rudy E. ; Parilla, Barbara V. ; MacGregor, Scott N. / Fetal bladder sagittal length : A simple monitor to assess normal and enlarged fetal bladder size, and forecast clinical outcome. In: Journal of Urology. 2004 ; Vol. 172, No. 5 I. pp. 1995-1999.
@article{8966507edaf945c391cc0eb285c1a952,
title = "Fetal bladder sagittal length: A simple monitor to assess normal and enlarged fetal bladder size, and forecast clinical outcome",
abstract = "Purpose: We examined if the parameter of fetal bladder sagittal length (FBSL) could serve as a monitor of normative and enlarged fetal bladder size. Materials and Methods: There were 76 consecutive cases examined between 1984 and 2000 that included measurement of fetal bladder size as FBSL and postnatal urological followup. Fetal images used to assess normal bladder size were derived from cases in which the bladder was normal on prenatal imaging and postnatal testing. An enlarged bladder was categorized as being greater than the 95{\%} CI for a given gestational age (GA). The presence and extent of renal pelvic dilatation were also noted and correlated with FBSL. Results: Measuring normal FBSL in 39 fetuses showed an exponential growth pattern (r = 0.76), which could be represented by the approximate linear formula FBSL = GA in weeks -5 (±95{\%} upper/lower CI = 7). An enlarged bladder was diagnosed in 37 fetuses. A dilated bladder in 9 fetuses, defined as FBSL greater than the 95{\%} upper CI of normal (ie between GA + 2 and GA + 12), showed outcomes of posterior urethral valves, vesicoureteral reflux or a normal outcome. Megacystis in 28 fetuses, defined as FBSL greater than 10 mm larger than that of a dilated bladder (ie greater than GA + 12), showed additional outcomes of megacystis megaureter/vesicoureteral reflux or prune-belly syndrome. A normal outcome was significantly more likely in fetuses with a dilated bladder than in those with megacystis (p ≤0.05). The incidence of azotemia in those with a dilated bladder or megacystis and pyelectasis was significantly lower than that in those with megacystis with hydronephrosis (p ≤0.03). Conclusions: Postnatal diagnosis of fetuses that show an enlarged bladder is predicted based on whether the bladder is enlarged as a dilated bladder or megacystis and if the renal pelvis is enlarged as pyelectasis or hydronephrosis.",
keywords = "Abnormalities, Bladder, Fetus, Kidney, Ultrasonography",
author = "Max Maizels and Alpert, {Seth A.} and Houston, {John T.B.} and Sabbagha, {Rudy E.} and Parilla, {Barbara V.} and MacGregor, {Scott N.}",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/01.ju.0000142136.17222.07",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "172",
pages = "1995--1999",
journal = "Journal of Urology",
issn = "0022-5347",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "5 I",

}

Fetal bladder sagittal length : A simple monitor to assess normal and enlarged fetal bladder size, and forecast clinical outcome. / Maizels, Max; Alpert, Seth A.; Houston, John T.B.; Sabbagha, Rudy E.; Parilla, Barbara V.; MacGregor, Scott N.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 172, No. 5 I, 01.01.2004, p. 1995-1999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fetal bladder sagittal length

T2 - A simple monitor to assess normal and enlarged fetal bladder size, and forecast clinical outcome

AU - Maizels, Max

AU - Alpert, Seth A.

AU - Houston, John T.B.

AU - Sabbagha, Rudy E.

AU - Parilla, Barbara V.

AU - MacGregor, Scott N.

PY - 2004/1/1

Y1 - 2004/1/1

N2 - Purpose: We examined if the parameter of fetal bladder sagittal length (FBSL) could serve as a monitor of normative and enlarged fetal bladder size. Materials and Methods: There were 76 consecutive cases examined between 1984 and 2000 that included measurement of fetal bladder size as FBSL and postnatal urological followup. Fetal images used to assess normal bladder size were derived from cases in which the bladder was normal on prenatal imaging and postnatal testing. An enlarged bladder was categorized as being greater than the 95% CI for a given gestational age (GA). The presence and extent of renal pelvic dilatation were also noted and correlated with FBSL. Results: Measuring normal FBSL in 39 fetuses showed an exponential growth pattern (r = 0.76), which could be represented by the approximate linear formula FBSL = GA in weeks -5 (±95% upper/lower CI = 7). An enlarged bladder was diagnosed in 37 fetuses. A dilated bladder in 9 fetuses, defined as FBSL greater than the 95% upper CI of normal (ie between GA + 2 and GA + 12), showed outcomes of posterior urethral valves, vesicoureteral reflux or a normal outcome. Megacystis in 28 fetuses, defined as FBSL greater than 10 mm larger than that of a dilated bladder (ie greater than GA + 12), showed additional outcomes of megacystis megaureter/vesicoureteral reflux or prune-belly syndrome. A normal outcome was significantly more likely in fetuses with a dilated bladder than in those with megacystis (p ≤0.05). The incidence of azotemia in those with a dilated bladder or megacystis and pyelectasis was significantly lower than that in those with megacystis with hydronephrosis (p ≤0.03). Conclusions: Postnatal diagnosis of fetuses that show an enlarged bladder is predicted based on whether the bladder is enlarged as a dilated bladder or megacystis and if the renal pelvis is enlarged as pyelectasis or hydronephrosis.

AB - Purpose: We examined if the parameter of fetal bladder sagittal length (FBSL) could serve as a monitor of normative and enlarged fetal bladder size. Materials and Methods: There were 76 consecutive cases examined between 1984 and 2000 that included measurement of fetal bladder size as FBSL and postnatal urological followup. Fetal images used to assess normal bladder size were derived from cases in which the bladder was normal on prenatal imaging and postnatal testing. An enlarged bladder was categorized as being greater than the 95% CI for a given gestational age (GA). The presence and extent of renal pelvic dilatation were also noted and correlated with FBSL. Results: Measuring normal FBSL in 39 fetuses showed an exponential growth pattern (r = 0.76), which could be represented by the approximate linear formula FBSL = GA in weeks -5 (±95% upper/lower CI = 7). An enlarged bladder was diagnosed in 37 fetuses. A dilated bladder in 9 fetuses, defined as FBSL greater than the 95% upper CI of normal (ie between GA + 2 and GA + 12), showed outcomes of posterior urethral valves, vesicoureteral reflux or a normal outcome. Megacystis in 28 fetuses, defined as FBSL greater than 10 mm larger than that of a dilated bladder (ie greater than GA + 12), showed additional outcomes of megacystis megaureter/vesicoureteral reflux or prune-belly syndrome. A normal outcome was significantly more likely in fetuses with a dilated bladder than in those with megacystis (p ≤0.05). The incidence of azotemia in those with a dilated bladder or megacystis and pyelectasis was significantly lower than that in those with megacystis with hydronephrosis (p ≤0.03). Conclusions: Postnatal diagnosis of fetuses that show an enlarged bladder is predicted based on whether the bladder is enlarged as a dilated bladder or megacystis and if the renal pelvis is enlarged as pyelectasis or hydronephrosis.

KW - Abnormalities

KW - Bladder

KW - Fetus

KW - Kidney

KW - Ultrasonography

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=5444274598&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=5444274598&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.ju.0000142136.17222.07

DO - 10.1097/01.ju.0000142136.17222.07

M3 - Article

VL - 172

SP - 1995

EP - 1999

JO - Journal of Urology

JF - Journal of Urology

SN - 0022-5347

IS - 5 I

ER -