Fifteen years later: Can residential mobility programs provide a long-term escape from neighborhood segregation, crime, and poverty

Micere Keels, Greg J. Duncan, Stefanie Deluca, Ruby Mendenhall, James Rosenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

100 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined whether the Gautreaux residential mobility program, which moved poor black volunteer families who were living in inner-city Chicago into more-affluent and integrated neighborhoods, produced long-run improvements in the neighborhood environments of the participants. We found that although all the participants moved in the 6 to 22 years since their initial placements, they continued to reside in neighborhoods with income levels that matched those of their placement neighborhoods. Families who were placed in higher-income, mostly white neighborhoods were currently living in the most-affluent neighborhoods. Families who were placed in lower-crime and suburban locations were most likely to reside in low-crime neighborhoods years later.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-73
JournalDemography
Volume42
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Fifteen years later: Can residential mobility programs provide a long-term escape from neighborhood segregation, crime, and poverty'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this