Financial burden is associated with worse health-related quality of life in adults with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

Benjamin J. Peipert, Sneha Goswami, Irene Helenowski, Susan E. Yount, Cord Sturgeon*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Health-related quality of life and financial burden among patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is poorly described. It is not known how financial burden influences health-related quality of life in this population. We hypothesized that the financial burden attributable to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is associated with worse health-related quality of life. Methods United States adults (≥18 years) with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 were recruited from the AMENSupport MEN online support group. Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and financial burden were assessed via an online survey. The instrument Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System 29-item profile measure was used to assess health-related quality of life. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify significant variables in each Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System domain. Results Out of 1,378 members in AMENSupport, our survey link was accessed 449 times (33%). Of 153 US respondents who completed our survey, 84% reported financial burden attributable to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. The degree of financial burden had a linear relationship with worse health-related quality of life across all Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System domains (r = 0.36–0.55, P <.001); 63% reported experiencing ≥1 negative financial event(s). Borrowing money from friends/family (30%), unemployment (13%), and spending >$100/month out-of-pocket on prescription medications (46%) were associated consistently with impaired health-related quality of life (ß = 3.75–6.77, P <.05). Respondents were 3- and 34-times more likely to be unemployed and declare bankruptcy than the US population, respectively. Conclusion This study characterizes the financial burden in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. Individuals with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 report a high degree of financial burden, negative financial events, and unemployment. Each of these factors was associated with worse health-related quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1278-1285
Number of pages8
JournalSurgery (United States)
Volume162
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1
Quality of Life
Information Systems
Bankruptcy
Unemployment
Self-Help Groups
Population
Prescriptions
Linear Models
Demography
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

@article{727ba9b12fda4e8c88865371bfc6b200,
title = "Financial burden is associated with worse health-related quality of life in adults with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1",
abstract = "Background Health-related quality of life and financial burden among patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is poorly described. It is not known how financial burden influences health-related quality of life in this population. We hypothesized that the financial burden attributable to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is associated with worse health-related quality of life. Methods United States adults (≥18 years) with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 were recruited from the AMENSupport MEN online support group. Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and financial burden were assessed via an online survey. The instrument Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System 29-item profile measure was used to assess health-related quality of life. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify significant variables in each Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System domain. Results Out of 1,378 members in AMENSupport, our survey link was accessed 449 times (33{\%}). Of 153 US respondents who completed our survey, 84{\%} reported financial burden attributable to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. The degree of financial burden had a linear relationship with worse health-related quality of life across all Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System domains (r = 0.36–0.55, P <.001); 63{\%} reported experiencing ≥1 negative financial event(s). Borrowing money from friends/family (30{\%}), unemployment (13{\%}), and spending >$100/month out-of-pocket on prescription medications (46{\%}) were associated consistently with impaired health-related quality of life ({\ss} = 3.75–6.77, P <.05). Respondents were 3- and 34-times more likely to be unemployed and declare bankruptcy than the US population, respectively. Conclusion This study characterizes the financial burden in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. Individuals with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 report a high degree of financial burden, negative financial events, and unemployment. Each of these factors was associated with worse health-related quality of life.",
author = "Peipert, {Benjamin J.} and Sneha Goswami and Irene Helenowski and Yount, {Susan E.} and Cord Sturgeon",
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Financial burden is associated with worse health-related quality of life in adults with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. / Peipert, Benjamin J.; Goswami, Sneha; Helenowski, Irene; Yount, Susan E.; Sturgeon, Cord.

In: Surgery (United States), Vol. 162, No. 6, 01.12.2017, p. 1278-1285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Financial burden is associated with worse health-related quality of life in adults with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

AU - Peipert, Benjamin J.

AU - Goswami, Sneha

AU - Helenowski, Irene

AU - Yount, Susan E.

AU - Sturgeon, Cord

PY - 2017/12/1

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N2 - Background Health-related quality of life and financial burden among patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is poorly described. It is not known how financial burden influences health-related quality of life in this population. We hypothesized that the financial burden attributable to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is associated with worse health-related quality of life. Methods United States adults (≥18 years) with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 were recruited from the AMENSupport MEN online support group. Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and financial burden were assessed via an online survey. The instrument Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System 29-item profile measure was used to assess health-related quality of life. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify significant variables in each Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System domain. Results Out of 1,378 members in AMENSupport, our survey link was accessed 449 times (33%). Of 153 US respondents who completed our survey, 84% reported financial burden attributable to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. The degree of financial burden had a linear relationship with worse health-related quality of life across all Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System domains (r = 0.36–0.55, P <.001); 63% reported experiencing ≥1 negative financial event(s). Borrowing money from friends/family (30%), unemployment (13%), and spending >$100/month out-of-pocket on prescription medications (46%) were associated consistently with impaired health-related quality of life (ß = 3.75–6.77, P <.05). Respondents were 3- and 34-times more likely to be unemployed and declare bankruptcy than the US population, respectively. Conclusion This study characterizes the financial burden in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. Individuals with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 report a high degree of financial burden, negative financial events, and unemployment. Each of these factors was associated with worse health-related quality of life.

AB - Background Health-related quality of life and financial burden among patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is poorly described. It is not known how financial burden influences health-related quality of life in this population. We hypothesized that the financial burden attributable to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is associated with worse health-related quality of life. Methods United States adults (≥18 years) with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 were recruited from the AMENSupport MEN online support group. Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and financial burden were assessed via an online survey. The instrument Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System 29-item profile measure was used to assess health-related quality of life. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify significant variables in each Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System domain. Results Out of 1,378 members in AMENSupport, our survey link was accessed 449 times (33%). Of 153 US respondents who completed our survey, 84% reported financial burden attributable to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. The degree of financial burden had a linear relationship with worse health-related quality of life across all Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System domains (r = 0.36–0.55, P <.001); 63% reported experiencing ≥1 negative financial event(s). Borrowing money from friends/family (30%), unemployment (13%), and spending >$100/month out-of-pocket on prescription medications (46%) were associated consistently with impaired health-related quality of life (ß = 3.75–6.77, P <.05). Respondents were 3- and 34-times more likely to be unemployed and declare bankruptcy than the US population, respectively. Conclusion This study characterizes the financial burden in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. Individuals with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 report a high degree of financial burden, negative financial events, and unemployment. Each of these factors was associated with worse health-related quality of life.

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