First-year residents outperform third-year residents after simulation-based education in critical care medicine

Benjamin Singer*, Thomas C Corbridge, Clara J Schroedl, Jane E Wilcox, Elaine R. Cohen, William Craig McGaghie, Diane Bronstein Wayne

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Previous research shows that gaps exist in internal medicine residents' critical care knowledge and skills. The purpose of this study was to compare the bedside critical care competency of first-year residents who received a simulation-based educational intervention plus clinical training with third-year residents who received clinical training alone. METHODS: During their first 3 months of residency, a group of first-year residents completed a simulation-based educational intervention. A group of traditionally trained third-year residents who did not receive simulation-based training served as a comparison group. Both groups were evaluated using a 20-item clinical skills assessment at the bedside of a patient receiving mechanical ventilation at the end of their medical intensive care unit rotation. Scores on the skills assessment were compared between groups. RESULTS: Simulator-trained first-year residents (n = 40) scored significantly higher compared with traditionally trained third-year residents (n = 27) on the bedside assessment (91.3% [95% confidence interval, 88.2%-94.3%] vs. 80.9% [95% confidence interval, 76.8%-85.0%]; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: First-year residents who completed a simulation-based educational intervention demonstrated higher clinical competency compared with third-year residents who did not undergo simulation training. Critical care competency cannot be assumed after clinical intensive care unit rotations; simulation-based curricula can help ensure residents are proficient to care for critically ill patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-71
Number of pages5
JournalSimulation in Healthcare
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013

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Intensive care units
Critical Care
Medicine
Clinical Competence
Education
medicine
resident
simulation
Intensive Care Units
Confidence Intervals
Curricula
education
Simulation
Simulators
Confidence interval
Internship and Residency
Internal Medicine
Artificial Respiration
Critical Illness
Curriculum

Keywords

  • Competency-based education
  • Medical simulation
  • Residency education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Education
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

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title = "First-year residents outperform third-year residents after simulation-based education in critical care medicine",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Previous research shows that gaps exist in internal medicine residents' critical care knowledge and skills. The purpose of this study was to compare the bedside critical care competency of first-year residents who received a simulation-based educational intervention plus clinical training with third-year residents who received clinical training alone. METHODS: During their first 3 months of residency, a group of first-year residents completed a simulation-based educational intervention. A group of traditionally trained third-year residents who did not receive simulation-based training served as a comparison group. Both groups were evaluated using a 20-item clinical skills assessment at the bedside of a patient receiving mechanical ventilation at the end of their medical intensive care unit rotation. Scores on the skills assessment were compared between groups. RESULTS: Simulator-trained first-year residents (n = 40) scored significantly higher compared with traditionally trained third-year residents (n = 27) on the bedside assessment (91.3{\%} [95{\%} confidence interval, 88.2{\%}-94.3{\%}] vs. 80.9{\%} [95{\%} confidence interval, 76.8{\%}-85.0{\%}]; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: First-year residents who completed a simulation-based educational intervention demonstrated higher clinical competency compared with third-year residents who did not undergo simulation training. Critical care competency cannot be assumed after clinical intensive care unit rotations; simulation-based curricula can help ensure residents are proficient to care for critically ill patients.",
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AU - Schroedl, Clara J

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AU - Cohen, Elaine R.

AU - McGaghie, William Craig

AU - Wayne, Diane Bronstein

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N2 - INTRODUCTION: Previous research shows that gaps exist in internal medicine residents' critical care knowledge and skills. The purpose of this study was to compare the bedside critical care competency of first-year residents who received a simulation-based educational intervention plus clinical training with third-year residents who received clinical training alone. METHODS: During their first 3 months of residency, a group of first-year residents completed a simulation-based educational intervention. A group of traditionally trained third-year residents who did not receive simulation-based training served as a comparison group. Both groups were evaluated using a 20-item clinical skills assessment at the bedside of a patient receiving mechanical ventilation at the end of their medical intensive care unit rotation. Scores on the skills assessment were compared between groups. RESULTS: Simulator-trained first-year residents (n = 40) scored significantly higher compared with traditionally trained third-year residents (n = 27) on the bedside assessment (91.3% [95% confidence interval, 88.2%-94.3%] vs. 80.9% [95% confidence interval, 76.8%-85.0%]; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: First-year residents who completed a simulation-based educational intervention demonstrated higher clinical competency compared with third-year residents who did not undergo simulation training. Critical care competency cannot be assumed after clinical intensive care unit rotations; simulation-based curricula can help ensure residents are proficient to care for critically ill patients.

AB - INTRODUCTION: Previous research shows that gaps exist in internal medicine residents' critical care knowledge and skills. The purpose of this study was to compare the bedside critical care competency of first-year residents who received a simulation-based educational intervention plus clinical training with third-year residents who received clinical training alone. METHODS: During their first 3 months of residency, a group of first-year residents completed a simulation-based educational intervention. A group of traditionally trained third-year residents who did not receive simulation-based training served as a comparison group. Both groups were evaluated using a 20-item clinical skills assessment at the bedside of a patient receiving mechanical ventilation at the end of their medical intensive care unit rotation. Scores on the skills assessment were compared between groups. RESULTS: Simulator-trained first-year residents (n = 40) scored significantly higher compared with traditionally trained third-year residents (n = 27) on the bedside assessment (91.3% [95% confidence interval, 88.2%-94.3%] vs. 80.9% [95% confidence interval, 76.8%-85.0%]; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: First-year residents who completed a simulation-based educational intervention demonstrated higher clinical competency compared with third-year residents who did not undergo simulation training. Critical care competency cannot be assumed after clinical intensive care unit rotations; simulation-based curricula can help ensure residents are proficient to care for critically ill patients.

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