Fluorescence in situ hybridization for distinguishing nevoid melanomas from mitotically active nevi

Pedram Gerami*, Amanda Wass, Mariam Mafee, Yuaquin Fang, Melissa P. Pulitzer, Klaus J. Busam

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

104 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nevoid melanoma may resemble benign compound or intradermal nevi by their silhouette and profile on low power. Higher power usually reveals nuclear atypia, confluence of cells, incomplete maturation and dermal mitotic activity. However, to some extent all of these features maybe seen in benign compound or intradermal nevi and no single criteria can be used to differentiate nevoid melanoma from a benign nevus. The distinction can be particularly problematic in nevi that show mitotic activity and we have noted a recent trend in diagnosis of melanocytic neoplasms with dermal mitosis as nevoid melanoma despite the presence of normal maturation in the dermis and lack of significant nuclear atypia. Therefore in this study we evaluated 10 nevoid melanomas, 4 of which resulted in metastasis and 10 mitotically active nevi with fluorescence in situ hybridization targeting key chromosomal loci previously shown to effectively discriminate been malignant and benign melanocytic neoplasms. All 10 nevoid melanomas showed copy number abnormalities by fluorescence in situ hybridization in either chromosome 6 or 11 while none of the 10 mitotically active nevi did. The results demonstrate that fluorescence in situ hybridization targeting key chromosomal loci on chromosomes 6 and 11 can be effective in discriminating nevoid melanomas from mitotically active nevi. Additionally, our study presents further evidence that dermal mitoses alone without other diagnostic features such as nuclear atypia and lack of maturation does not constitute sufficient evidence alone for a diagnosis of melanoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1783-1788
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgical Pathology
Volume33
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

Keywords

  • Fluorescence in situ hybridization
  • Mitotically active nevi
  • Nevoid melanoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

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