Food insufficiency is associated with lack of sustained viral suppression among HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding ugandan women

Catherine A. Koss*, Paul Natureeba, Dorcas Nyafwono, Albert Plenty, Julia Mwesigwa, Bridget Nzarubara, Tamara D. Clark, Theodore D. Ruel, Jane Achan, Edwin D. Charlebois, Deborah Cohan, Moses R. Kamya, Diane V. Havlir, Sera L. Young

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Food insecurity is associated with poor virologic outcomes, but this has not been studied during pregnancy and breastfeeding. We assessed sustained viral suppression from 8 weeks on antiretroviral therapy to 48 weeks postpartum among 171 pregnant and breastfeeding Ugandan women; 74.9% experienced food insufficiency. In multivariable analysis, food insufficiency [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16 to 0.91], higher pretreatment HIV-1 RNA (aOR 0.55 per 10-fold increase, 95% CI: 0.37 to 0.82), and lopinavir/ritonavir versus efavirenz (aOR 0.49, 95% CI: 0.24 to 0.96) were associated with lower odds of sustained viral suppression. Interventions to address food security may improve virologic outcomes among HIVinfected women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)310-315
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Food insecurity
  • Household hunger
  • Nutrition
  • Perinatal transmission
  • Pregnancy
  • Virologic outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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