Forging Fiscal Reform: Constitutional Change, Public Policy, and the Creation of Administrative Capacity in Wisconsin, 1880–1920

Ajay K. Mehrotra*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    12 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    At the turn of the twentieth century, Wisconsin, like many northern industrial states, faced a profound fiscal challenge. As one concerned citizen succinctly explained, “The two great administrative problems before our people at this time are, first, the control of corporate wealth, and, second, the establishment of a rational system of taxation.” The large-scale structural pressures created by the rise of corporate capitalism and the decline of an obsolete tax system forced all levels of government to reexamine the substance and administration of their fiscal policies. At the state and local level, many governments addressed the mismatch between the increasing demand for state services and the declining supply of revenue by turning to new levies and innovative forms of administration.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)94-112
    Number of pages19
    JournalJournal of Policy History
    Volume20
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 2008

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science
    • Public Administration

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