Fostering scientific argumentation by creating a need for students to attend to each other's claims and evidence

Leema Kuhn, Lisa O. Kenyon, Brian J. Reiser

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Scientific argumentation can provide students and teachers with opportunities to use evidence to make sense of the phenomena being studied and to engage in central practices of the scientific community. We posit that fostering the practice of argumentation requires transforming classroom interactions in order to create a need for students to attend to each other's claims and evidence. This paper examines the enactment of a 7th grade ecology unit created to generate this need and support these discussions. Our analyses of the student discussions show students moving beyond typical classroom interactions in order to understand the ways in which their claims differ and to evaluate one another's claims, in light of the evidence. Thus, we conclude that this approach of creating a need and supporting students as they attend to and critically evaluate one another's claims and evidence appears to be a promising strategy for fostering scientific argumentation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationICLS 2006 - International Conference of the Learning Sciences, Proceedings
Pages370-375
Number of pages6
StatePublished - 2006
Event7th International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2006 - Bloomington, IN, United States
Duration: Jun 27 2006Jul 1 2006

Publication series

NameICLS 2006 - International Conference of the Learning Sciences, Proceedings
Volume1

Other

Other7th International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2006
CountryUnited States
CityBloomington, IN
Period6/27/067/1/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Education

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  • Cite this

    Kuhn, L., Kenyon, L. O., & Reiser, B. J. (2006). Fostering scientific argumentation by creating a need for students to attend to each other's claims and evidence. In ICLS 2006 - International Conference of the Learning Sciences, Proceedings (pp. 370-375). (ICLS 2006 - International Conference of the Learning Sciences, Proceedings; Vol. 1).