Friends, Alcohol, and a Higher Power: An Analysis of Adaptive and Maladaptive Coping Strategies Among Gastroenterologists

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16 Scopus citations

Abstract

No study to date has evaluated the relationship between coping style, burnout, and psychological functioning among gastroenterologists (GEs). This study aims to explore this relationship. Physician stress and burnout are widely studied and associated with notably poorer outcomes for both physicians and their patients. Coping is a multidimensional construct that individuals use to adapt to stressful situations. To mitigate stress, physicians may use problem-focused or emotion-focused coping strategies. Four hundred ten GE fellows and attending physicians provided information about their practice, coping styles, level of burnout, psychological distress, job-related self-efficacy, and demographic background. Participants recruited from the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy membership through email completed a series of online questionnaires.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e76-e81
JournalJournal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Volume45
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

Keywords

  • Coping strategies
  • Gastroenterologist burnout
  • Psychological well-being
  • Self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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