From Punchlines to Punches: A Meta-Analysis of the Persuasive Effects of Horatian and Juvenalian Political Satires

Christopher M. Dobmeier*, John J. Brooks, Nathan Walter, R. Lance Holbert

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A meta-analysis evaluated the persuasive effects of political satire and how such effects may differ between Horatian (light-hearted) and Juvenalian (acerbic) satire types. A synthesis of 33 studies (N = 7,469) revealed that political satire is no more persuasive than serious news, but the data find several contingencies when distinguishing between satire types. Namely, satire type was found to interact with issue involvement and format, but not ideology or perceived humor. Particularly, persuasion was enhanced by Juvenalian sketch format (compared with news format) satire, as well as Juvenalian satire for high-involvement individuals, but was inhibited by Horatian satire for those same individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournalism and Mass Communication Quarterly
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Keywords

  • Horatian and Juvenalian
  • meta-analysis
  • persuasion
  • political satire

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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