From remediation to application: An investigation of common misconceptions associated with vector analysis in an undergraduate biomechanics course

Sara Koehler*, Wendy Murray

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction to Biomechanics (BME 271) is a required course in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Northwestern University, covering basic concepts in rigid-body mechanics with applications in biology and physiology. Building on previous experience with vector analysis, Newtonian mechanics, and free-body diagrams, BME 271 is designed to provide sophomore engineering students with a foundation in statics and strength of materials in preparation for more advanced topics in dynamics and soft-tissue mechanics. In order to promote student engagement and knowledge transfer within our curriculum, we have recently incorporated several innovative teaching methods into our instruction base, including online courseware developed by the VaNTH ERC (Vanderbilt University; Northwestern University; University of Texas at Austin; and Health, Science and Technology at Harvard/MIT Engineering Research Center) for Bioengineering Educational Technologies1, Personal Response Systems (PRS) to enhance formative assessment, and challenge-based homework assignments to emphasize the application of fundamental engineering skills in biomechanics. The goal of this paper is to discuss our experience with these methods, highlighting how we have used PRS to systematically diagnose and address common misconceptions associated with prerequisite course material and guide our delivery of new concepts in order to improve learning outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Event2010 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition - Louisville, KY, United States
Duration: Jun 20 2010Jun 23 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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