From Vulnerable to Venerated: The Institutionalization of Academic Entrepreneurship in the Life Sciences

Jeannette A. Colyvas, Walter W. Powell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

76 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examine the origins, acceptance, and spread of academic entrepreneurship in the biomedical field at Stanford, a university that championed efforts at translating basic science into commercial application. With multiple data sources from 1970 to 2000, we analyze how entrepreneurship became institutionalized, stressing the distinction between factors that promoted such activity and those that sustained it. We address individual attributes, work contexts, and research networks, discerning the multiple influences that supported the commercialization of basic research and contributed to a new academic identity. We demonstrate how entrepreneurship expands from an uncommon undertaking to a venerated practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Sociology of Entrepeneurship
EditorsMartin Ruef, Michael Lounsbury
Pages219-259
Number of pages41
EditionSUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

Publication series

NameResearch in the Sociology of Organizations
NumberSUPPL.
Volume25
ISSN (Print)0733-558X

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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