Fusion of Three-Dimensional Echocardiographic Regional Myocardial Strain with Cardiac Computed Tomography for Noninvasive Evaluation of the Hemodynamic Impact of Coronary Stenosis in Patients with Chest Pain

Victor Mor-Avi*, Mita B. Patel, Francesco Maffessanti, Amita Singh, Diego Medvedofsky, S. Javed Zaidi, Anuj Mediratta, Akhil Narang, Noreen Nazir, Nadjia Kachenoura, Roberto M. Lang, Amit R. Patel

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Combined evaluation of coronary stenosis and the extent of ischemia is essential in patients with chest pain. Intermediate-grade stenosis on computed tomographic coronary angiography (CTCA) frequently triggers downstream nuclear stress testing. Alternative approaches without stress and/or radiation may have important implications. Myocardial strain measured from echocardiographic images can be used to detect subclinical dysfunction. The authors recently tested the feasibility of fusion of three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography–derived regional resting longitudinal strain with coronary arteries from CTCA to determine the hemodynamic significance of stenosis. The aim of the present study was to validate this approach against accepted reference techniques. Methods: Seventy-eight patients with chest pain referred for CTCA who also underwent 3D echocardiography and regadenoson stress computed tomography were prospectively studied. Left ventricular longitudinal strain data (TomTec) were used to generate fused 3D displays and detect resting strain abnormalities (RSAs) in each coronary territory. Computed tomographic coronary angiographic images were interpreted for the presence and severity of stenosis. Fused 3D displays of subendocardial x-ray attenuation were created to detect stress perfusion defects (SPDs). In patients with stenosis >25% in at least one artery, fractional flow reserve was quantified (HeartFlow). RSA as a marker of significant stenosis was validated against two different combined references: stenosis >50% on CTCA and SPDs seen in the same territory (reference standard A) and fractional flow reserve < 0.80 and SPDs in the same territory (reference standard B). Results: Of the 99 arteries with no stenosis >50% and no SPDs, considered as normal, 19 (19%) had RSAs. Conversely, with stenosis >50% and SPDs, RSAs were considerably more frequent (17 of 24 [71%]). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of RSA were 0.71, 0.81, and 0.79, respectively, against reference standard A and 0.83, 0.81, and 0.82 against reference standard B. Conclusions: Fusion of CTCA and 3D echocardiography–derived resting myocardial strain provides combined displays, which may be useful in determination of the hemodynamic or functional impact of coronary abnormalities, without additional ionizing radiation or stress testing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)664-673
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Society of Echocardiography
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

Keywords

  • 3D echocardiography
  • Cardiovascular CT
  • Fusion imaging
  • Myocardial strain
  • Myocardium perfusion
  • Vasodilator stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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