Gender differences in early suspicion of tuberculosis in hospitalized, high-risk patients during 4 epidemic years, 1987 to 1990

J. Peter Cegielski*, Matthew B. Goetz, Jeffrey M. Jacobson, Susan E. Cohn, Robert A. Weinstein, Jack A. DeHovitz, Charles L. Bennett

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the degree to which, from 1987 to 1990, physicians suspected tuberculosis (TB) in the first 2 hospital days in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with pulmonary disease. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: 96 hospitals in five US cities. Patients: 2,174 adult patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome discharged with a diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia from 1987 to 1990. The diagnosis generally was not known on admission. Results: Physicians suspected TB in the first 2 hospital days in 66% of these patients in 1987, a rate that increased steadily to 74% in 1990. However, the extent to which physicians considered TB among female patients decreased from 76% to 71% over the 4 years. Controlling for confounding variables by multiple logistic regression, the odds that TB would be suspected early increased 1.8-fold among men (odds ratio [OR], 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI95], 1.4-2.4), but not in women (OR, 0.6; CI95, 0.2-1.9). Among the five cities, the odds of early suspicion of TB increased most in New York City (OR, 3.9; CI95, 2.0-7.9). Conclusions: Physicians considered TB in a timely manner in an increasing majority of male, but not female, high-risk patients during the first years of TB resurgence in the United States. Physicians must be aware of the changing epidemiology of HIV and TB, as well as their practice patterns, to prevent nosocomial transmission of this disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-243
Number of pages7
JournalInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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