Gender differences in offaxis neuromuscular control during stepping under a slippery condition

Song Joo Lee, Yupeng Ren, François Geiger, Li Qun Zhang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Females are at greater risks of musculoskeletal injuries than are males, which may be related to decreased neuromuscular control in axial and/or frontal planes, offaxis neuromuscular control. The objective of this study was to investigate gender differences in offaxis neuromuscular control during stepping under a slippery condition. Methods: Forty-three healthy subjects (21 males and 22 females) performed different stepping tasks under a slippery condition, namely, free pivoting task (FPT) to control axial plane pivoting, free sliding task (FST) to control frontal plane sliding, and free pivoting and sliding task (FPST) to control axial pivoting, and frontal sliding on a custom-made offaxis elliptical trainer. Results: Compared to males, females showed significantly higher pivoting instability, higher max internal and external pivoting angles, higher mean max medial and lateral sliding distance, and higher entropy of time to peak EMG in the medial and lateral gastrocnemius muscles during the FPST and higher entropy of time to peak EMG in the lateral gastrocnemius muscle during the FPT and FST. Conclusions: The findings may help us understand potential injury risk factors associated with gender differences, and provide a basis for developing targeted neuromuscular training to improve offaxis neuromuscular control, and reduce musculoskeletal injuries associated with excessive offaxis loadings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2857-2866
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Volume113
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Musculoskeletal injuries
  • Offaxis neuromuscular control
  • Risk factors
  • Slippery condition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physiology (medical)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Gender differences in offaxis neuromuscular control during stepping under a slippery condition'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this