Gendered Taskscapes: Food, Farming, and Craft Production in Banda, Ghana in the Eighteenth to Twenty-first Centuries

Amanda L. Logan, M. Dores Cruz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article blends insights from gender, technology, and development studies with Ingold's concept of taskscape to examine the interrelated nature of farming, food, and craft manufacture practices in Banda, Ghana during the last three centuries. We begin by comparing two ethnoarchaeological studies that were conducted separately by the authors, one that focused on food, and the other on ceramic production, preparation, and consumption. We use these data to analyze gendered taskscapes and how they have changed in recent decades with the introduction of new technologies and major economic and environmental shifts. Building on such insights, we analyze how taskscapes shifted in earlier centuries in Banda through archaeological remains of food and craft practice at the eighteenth- to twentieth-century site of Makala Kataa. Craft production cannot be fully understood without reference to food production, preparation, and consumption; thus, viewing these practices as interrelated tasks in a gendered taskscape yields insight into the rhythms of everyday life and highlights women's often undervalued skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-231
Number of pages29
JournalAfrican Archaeological Review
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

Keywords

  • Agriculture
  • Ethnoarchaeology
  • Food
  • Gender
  • Ghana
  • Pottery
  • Taskscape
  • Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • Archaeology

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