Genome-wide associations of gene expression variation in humans

Barbara Elaine Stranger, Matthew S. Forrest, Andrew G. Clark, Mark J. Minichiello, Samuel Deutsch, Robert Lyle, Sarah Hunt, Brenda Kahl, Stylianos E. Antonarakis, Simon Tavaré, Panagiotis Deloukas*, Emmanouil T. Dermitzakis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

408 Scopus citations

Abstract

The exploration of quantitative variation in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The successful identification of variants that contribute to complex traits is highly dependent on reliable assays and genetic maps. We have performed a genome-wide quantitative trait analysis of 630 genes in 60 unrelated Utah residents with ancestry from Northern and Western Europe using the publicly available phase I data of the International HapMap project. The genes are located in regions of the human genome with elevated functional annotation and disease interest including the ENCODE regions spanning 1% of the genome, Chromosome 21 and Chromosome 20q12-13.2. We apply three different methods of multiple test correction, including Bonferroni, false discovery rate, and permutations. For the 374 expressed genes, we find many regions with statistically significant association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with expression variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines after correcting for multiple tests. Based on our analyses, the signal proximal (cis-) to the genes of interest is more abundant and more stable than distal and trans across statistical methodologies. Our results suggest that regulatory polymorphism is widespread in the human genome and show that the 5-kb (phase I) HapMap has sufficient density to enable linkage disequilibrium mapping in humans. Such studies will significantly enhance our ability to annotate the non-coding part of the genome and interpret functional variation. In addition, we demonstrate that the HapMap cell lines themselves may serve as a useful resource for quantitative measurements at the cellular level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)695-704
Number of pages10
JournalPLoS genetics
Volume1
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Cancer Research

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