Gestational weight gain

Michelle Kominiarek*, Alan M Peaceman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prenatal care providers are advised to evaluate maternal weight at each regularly scheduled prenatal visit, monitor progress toward meeting weight gain goals, and provide individualized counseling if significant deviations from a woman's goals occur. Today, nearly 50% of women exceed their weight gain goals with overweight and obese women having the highest prevalence of excessive weight gain. Risks of inadequate weight gain include low birthweight and failure to initiate breast-feeding whereas the risks of excessive weight gain include cesarean deliveries and postpartum weight retention for the mother and large-for-gestational-age infants, macrosomia, and childhood overweight or obesity for the offspring. Prenatal care providers have many resources and tools to incorporate weight and other health behavior counseling into routine prenatal practices. Because many women are motivated to improve health behaviors, pregnancy is often considered the optimal time to intervene for issues related to eating habits and physical activity to prevent excessive weight gain. Gestational weight gain is a potentially modifiable risk factor for a number of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials report that diet or exercise interventions during pregnancy can help reduce excessive weight gain. However, health behavior interventions for gestational weight gain have not significantly improved other maternal and neonatal outcomes and have limited effectiveness in overweight and obese women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)642-651
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume217
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Weight Gain
Health Behavior
Mothers
Prenatal Care
Weights and Measures
Counseling
Exercise
Pregnancy
Feeding Behavior
Breast Feeding
Postpartum Period
Gestational Age
Meta-Analysis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Obesity
Diet

Keywords

  • gestational weight gain
  • health behavior interventions
  • motivational interviewing
  • perinatal outcomes
  • pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

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Gestational weight gain. / Kominiarek, Michelle; Peaceman, Alan M.

In: American journal of obstetrics and gynecology, Vol. 217, No. 6, 01.12.2017, p. 642-651.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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