Glypican 4 and Mmp14 interact in regulating the migration of anterior endodermal cells by limiting extracellular matrix deposition

Bo Hu, Yuanyuan Gao, Lauren Davies, Stephanie Woo, Jacek Topczewski, Jason R. Jessen, Fang Lin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

During embryogenesis, the germ layers, including the endoderm, undergo convergence and extension movements to narrow and elongate the body plan. In zebrafish, the dorsal migration of endodermal cells during gastrulation is controlled by chemokine signaling, but little is known about how they migrate during segmentation. Here, we show that glypican 4 (Gpc4), a member of the heparin sulfate proteoglycan family, is required for efficient migration of anterior endodermal cells during early segmentation, regulating Rac activation to maintain polarized actin-rich lamellipodia. An endoderm transplantation assay showed that Gpc4 regulates endoderm migration in a non-cell-autonomous fashion. Further analyses revealed that the impaired endoderm migration in gpc4 mutants results from increases in the expression and assembly of fibronectin and laminin, major components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Notably, we found that matrix metalloproteinase 14 (Mmp14a/b) is required for the control of ECM expression during endoderm migration, with Gpc4 acting through Mmp14a/b to limit ECM expression. Our results suggest that Gpc4 is crucial for generating the environment required for efficient migration of endodermal cells, uncovering a novel function of Gpc4 during development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberdev163303
JournalDevelopment (Cambridge)
Volume145
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2018

Keywords

  • Cell migration
  • Endoderm
  • Extracellular matrix
  • Glypican 4
  • Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology

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