Graduating internal medicine residents' self-assessment and performance of advanced cardiac life support skills

Diane B. Wayne*, John Butter, Viva J. Siddall, Monica J. Fudala, Leonard D. Wade, Joe Feinglass, William C. McGaghie

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Internal medicine residents in the US must be competent to perform procedures including Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) to become board-eligible. Our aim was to determine if residents near graduation could assess their skills in ACLS procedures accurately. Participants were 40 residents in a university-based training program. Self-assessments of confidence in managing six ACLS scenarios were measured on a 0 (very low) to 100 (very high) scale. These were compared to reliable observational ratings of residents' performance on a high-fidelity simulator using published treatment protocols. Residents expressed strong self-confidence about managing the scenarios. Residents' simulator performance varied widely (range from 45% to 94%). Self-confidence assessments correlated poorly with performance (median r=0.075). Self-assessment of performance by graduating internal medicine residents was not accurate in this study. The use of self-assessment to document resident competence in procedures such as ACLS is not a proxy for objective evaluation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)365-369
Number of pages5
JournalMedical Teacher
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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