Granger causality analysis of functional connectivity of spiking neurons in orofacial motor cortex during chewing and swallowing

Kazutaka Takahashi*, Lorenzo Pesce, José Iriarte-Díaz, Sanggyun Kim, Todd P. Coleman, Nicholas G. Hatsopoulos, Callum F. Ross

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Primate feeding behavior is characterized by a series of jaw movement cycles of different types making it ideal for investigating the role of motor cortex in controlling transitions between different kinematic states. We recorded spiking activity in populations of neurons in the orofacial portion of primary motor cortex (MIo) of a macaque monkey and, using a Granger causality model, estimated their functional connectivity during transitions between chewing cycles and from chewing to swallowing cycles. We found that during rhythmic chewing, the network was dominated by excitatory connections and exhibited a few out degree hub neurons, while during transitions from rhythmic chews to swallows, the numbers of excitatory and inhibitory connections became comparable, and more in degree hub neurons emerged. These results suggest that networks of neurons in MIo change their operative states with changes in kinematically defined behavioral states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2012 Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2012
Pages4587-4590
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event34th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2012 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Aug 28 2012Sep 1 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
ISSN (Print)1557-170X

Other

Other34th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2012
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period8/28/129/1/12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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