Great books, honors programs, and hidden origins: The Virginia plan and the University of Virginia in the liberal arts movement

William N. Haarlow*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Book/ReportBook

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The core of this book was originally my dissertation. Additional interviews, archival research, and revisions have ameliorated the work, but my first debt is to the faculty of the Center for the Study of Higher Education at the University of Virginia. I am foremost grateful to my advisor, Jennings L.Wagoner, Jr., who provided unwavering encouragement, knowledge, and insight during my graduate years and since. Dr.Wagoner has taught me much of what it means to be an historian, and how to be an exemplary teacher, mentor, colleague, and friend. Working with Dr.Wagoner has been, and continues to be, a privilege and honor in the best Jeffersonian senses of these words. Drs.Annette Gibbs, Jay Chronister, and Alton Taylor all provided support, encouragement, and direction. Dean David Breneman generously gave his time and resources during my time as his intern and later when he served on my doctoral committee. Sam Kellams provided initial direction and insight on this study while Brian Pusser rose to the occasion of a late committee appointment with voluminous editing and undaunted energy. Peter Onuf, chairman emeritus of the History Department, likewise served on my doctoral committee with patience, insight, and good humor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherRoutledgeFalmer
Number of pages253
ISBN (Print)0203463862, 9780203463864
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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