Haptic feedback enhances grip force control of sEMG-controlled prosthetic hands in targeted reinnervation amputees

Keehoon Kim*, J. Edward Colgate

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

72 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this study, we hypothesized that haptic feedback would enhance grip force control of surface electromyography (sEMG)-controlled prosthetic hands for targeted reinnervation (TR) amputees. A new miniature haptic device, a tactor, that can deliver touch, pressure, shear, and temperature sensation, allows modality-matching haptic feedback. TR surgery that creates sensory regions on the patient's skin that refer to the surface of the missing limb allows somatotopic-matching haptic feedback. This paper evaluates the hypothesis via an sEMG-controlled virtual prosthetic arm operated by TR amputees under diverse haptic feedback conditions. The results indicate that the grip force control is significantly enhanced via the haptic feedback. However, the simultaneous display of two haptic channels (pressure and shear) does not enhance, but instead degrades, grip force control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6249787
Pages (from-to)798-805
Number of pages8
JournalIEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Keywords

  • Grip force
  • mechanical haptic display
  • sensory feedback
  • surface electromyography (sEMG)-controlled prosthesis
  • targeted reinnervation (TR)
  • upper extremity prosthesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biomedical Engineering

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Haptic feedback enhances grip force control of sEMG-controlled prosthetic hands in targeted reinnervation amputees'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this