Haptic perception of multi-joint hypertonia during simulated patient-therapist physical tele-interaction

D. Piovesan, A. Melendez-Calderon*, F. A. Mussa-Ivaldi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

A potential solution to provide individualized physical therapy in remote areas is tele-interaction via robotic devices. To maintain stability during tele-interaction, transmission delay-compensation algorithms bound the impedance between the patient and the therapist. This can compromise the haptic perception of the patient being assessed, which can in turn lead to a bad diagnosis or intervention. We investigated how the perception of the severity of hypertonia (a common condition after neurological disorders) varied by modifying the connection impedance on a physical simulator. We found that assessing hypetonia using a low impedance connection may result in an overestimation of mild impairments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2013
Pages4143-4147
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 31 2013
Event2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2013 - Osaka, Japan
Duration: Jul 3 2013Jul 7 2013

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
ISSN (Print)1557-170X

Other

Other2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2013
CountryJapan
CityOsaka
Period7/3/137/7/13

Keywords

  • haptic perception
  • hypertonia
  • tele-rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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