Having a child to save a sibling: Reassessing risks and benefits of creating stem cell donors

Elaine R Morgan*, Jennifer Girod, John S. Rinehart

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This manuscript assesses the risks, benefits, and ethical concerns regarding the use of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) to create a new donor for stem cell transplantation. We address ethical literature, the medical and psychosocial impact on patient, donor, family, and medical caregivers, and the appropriate decision-making process. We conclude that the use of ART to create a stem cell donor can be ethically acceptable. The decision to conceive a donor has medical and psychosocial implications. The family is the appropriate decision-maker and must consider risks and benefits to all parties with input from medical caregivers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-253
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

Fingerprint

Siblings
Stem Cells
Tissue Donors
Assisted Reproductive Techniques
Caregivers
Stem Cell Transplantation
Decision Making

Keywords

  • Blood
  • Cord
  • Ethics
  • Pediatric hematology/oncology
  • Psychosocial
  • Stem cell transplantation
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

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abstract = "This manuscript assesses the risks, benefits, and ethical concerns regarding the use of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) to create a new donor for stem cell transplantation. We address ethical literature, the medical and psychosocial impact on patient, donor, family, and medical caregivers, and the appropriate decision-making process. We conclude that the use of ART to create a stem cell donor can be ethically acceptable. The decision to conceive a donor has medical and psychosocial implications. The family is the appropriate decision-maker and must consider risks and benefits to all parties with input from medical caregivers.",
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Having a child to save a sibling : Reassessing risks and benefits of creating stem cell donors. / Morgan, Elaine R; Girod, Jennifer; Rinehart, John S.

In: Pediatric Blood and Cancer, Vol. 48, No. 3, 01.03.2007, p. 249-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AB - This manuscript assesses the risks, benefits, and ethical concerns regarding the use of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) to create a new donor for stem cell transplantation. We address ethical literature, the medical and psychosocial impact on patient, donor, family, and medical caregivers, and the appropriate decision-making process. We conclude that the use of ART to create a stem cell donor can be ethically acceptable. The decision to conceive a donor has medical and psychosocial implications. The family is the appropriate decision-maker and must consider risks and benefits to all parties with input from medical caregivers.

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