Health behaviour outcomes of a family based intervention for paediatric obesity in primary care: A randomized type II hybrid effectiveness-implementation trial

Justin D. Smith*, Cady Berkel, Allison J. Carroll, Emily Fu, Kevin J. Grimm, Anne M. Mauricio, Jenna Rudo-Stern, Emily Winslow, Thomas J. Dishion, Neil Jordan, David C. Atkins, Shrikanth S. Narayanan, Carlos Gallo, Meg M. Bruening, Charlton Wilson, Farah Lokey, Kristen Samaddar

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Paediatric obesity is a multifaceted public health problem. Family based behavioural interventions are the recommended approach for the prevention of excess weight gain in children and adolescents, yet few have been tested under “real-world” conditions. Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of a family based intervention, delivered in coordination with paediatric primary care, on child and family health outcomes. Methods: A sample of 240 families with racially and ethnically diverse (86% non-White) and predominantly low-income children (49% female) ages 6 to 12 years (M = 9.5 years) with body mass index (BMI) ≥85th percentile for age and gender were identified in paediatric primary care. Participants were randomized to either the Family Check-Up 4 Health (FCU4Health) program (N = 141) or usual care plus information (N = 99). FCU4Health, an assessment-driven individually tailored intervention designed to preempt excess weight gain by improving parenting skills was delivered for 6 months in clinic, at home and in the community. Child BMI and body fat were assessed using a bioelectrical impedance scale and caregiver-reported health behaviours (eg, diet, physical activity and family health routines) were obtained at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Results: Change in child BMI and percent body fat did not differ by group assignment. Path analysis indicated significant group differences in child health behaviours at 12 months, mediated by improved family health routines at 6 months. Conclusion: The FCU4Health, delivered in coordination with paediatric primary care, significantly impacted child and family health behaviours that are associated with the development and maintenance of paediatric obesity. BMI did not significantly differ.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere12780
JournalPediatric Obesity
Volume16
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2021

Keywords

  • coordinated care
  • family check-up 4 health
  • hybrid effectiveness-implementation design
  • paediatric obesity
  • primary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Health Policy
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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