Health utility scores for people with type 2 diabetes in U.S. managed care health plans: Results from translating research into action for diabetes (TRIAD)

Ping Zhang*, Morton B. Brown, Dori Bilik, Ronald T. Ackermann, Rui Li, William H. Herman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To estimate the health utility scores associated with type 2 diabetes, its treatments, complications, and comorbidities. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We analyzed health-related quality-of-life data, collected at baseline during Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes, a multicenter, prospective, observational study of diabetes care in managed care, for 7,327 individuals with type 2 diabetes. We measured quality-of-life using the EuroQol (EQ)-5D, a standardized instrument for which 1.00 indicates perfect health. We used multivariable regression to estimate the independent impact of demographic characteristics, diabetes treatments, complications, and comorbidities on health-related quality-of-life. RESULTS - Themean EQ-5D-derived health utility score for those individualswith diabetes was 0.80. The modeled utility score for a nonobese, non-insulin-treated, non-Asian, non-Hispanicman with type 2 diabetes, with an annual household income ofmore than $40,000, and with no diabetes complications, risk factors for cardiovascular disease, or comorbidities, was 0.92. Being a woman, being obese, smoking, and having a lower household income were associated with lower utility scores. Arranging complications fromleast tomost severe according to the reduction in health utility scores resulted in the following order: peripheral vascular disease, other heart diseases, transient ischemic attack, cerebral vascular accident, nonpainful diabetic neuropathy, congestive heart failure, dialysis, hemiplegia, painful neuropathy, and amputation. CONCLUSIONS - Major diabetes complications and comorbidities are associated with decreased health-related quality-of-life. Utility estimates from our study can be used to assess the impact of diabetes on quality-of-life and conduct cost-utility analyses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2250-2256
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetes care
Volume35
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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