Healthcare provider diagnostic testing practices for identification of Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile in children

An Emerging Infections Network survey

Larry Kenneth Kociolek*, Preeta K. Kutty, Philip M. Polgreen, Susan E. Beekmann

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To characterize healthcare provider diagnostic testing practices for identifying Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile infection (CDI) and asymptomatic carriage in children.Design: Electronic survey.Methods: An 11-question survey was sent by e-mail or facsimile to all pediatric infectious diseases (PID) members of the Infectious Diseases Society of America's Emerging Infections Network (EIN).Results: Among 345 eligible respondents who had ever responded to an EIN survey, 196 (57%) responded; 162 of these (83%) were aware of their institutional policies for CDI testing and management. Also, 159 (98%) respondents knew their institution's C. difficile testing method: 99 (62%) utilize NAAT without toxin testing and 60 (38%) utilize toxin testing, either as a single test or a multistep algorithm. Of 153 respondents, 10 (7%) reported that formed stools were tested for C. difficile at their institution, and 76 of 151 (50%) reported that their institution does not restrict C. difficile testing in infants and young children. The frequency of symptom- A nd age-based testing restrictions did not vary between institutions utilizing NAAT alone compared to those utilizing toxin testing for C. difficile diagnosis. Of 143 respondents, 26 (16%) permit testing of neonatal intensive care unit patients and 12 of 26 (46%) treat CDI with antibiotics in this patient population.Conclusions: These data suggest that there are opportunities to improve CDI diagnostic stewardship practices in children, including among hospitals using NAATs alone for CDI diagnosis in children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)276-280
Number of pages5
JournalInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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Clostridium difficile
Clostridium Infections
Health Personnel
Infection
Communicable Diseases
Organizational Policy
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Postal Service
Surveys and Questionnaires
Pediatrics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Healthcare provider diagnostic testing practices for identification of Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile in children: An Emerging Infections Network survey",
abstract = "Objective: To characterize healthcare provider diagnostic testing practices for identifying Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile infection (CDI) and asymptomatic carriage in children.Design: Electronic survey.Methods: An 11-question survey was sent by e-mail or facsimile to all pediatric infectious diseases (PID) members of the Infectious Diseases Society of America's Emerging Infections Network (EIN).Results: Among 345 eligible respondents who had ever responded to an EIN survey, 196 (57{\%}) responded; 162 of these (83{\%}) were aware of their institutional policies for CDI testing and management. Also, 159 (98{\%}) respondents knew their institution's C. difficile testing method: 99 (62{\%}) utilize NAAT without toxin testing and 60 (38{\%}) utilize toxin testing, either as a single test or a multistep algorithm. Of 153 respondents, 10 (7{\%}) reported that formed stools were tested for C. difficile at their institution, and 76 of 151 (50{\%}) reported that their institution does not restrict C. difficile testing in infants and young children. The frequency of symptom- A nd age-based testing restrictions did not vary between institutions utilizing NAAT alone compared to those utilizing toxin testing for C. difficile diagnosis. Of 143 respondents, 26 (16{\%}) permit testing of neonatal intensive care unit patients and 12 of 26 (46{\%}) treat CDI with antibiotics in this patient population.Conclusions: These data suggest that there are opportunities to improve CDI diagnostic stewardship practices in children, including among hospitals using NAATs alone for CDI diagnosis in children.",
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Healthcare provider diagnostic testing practices for identification of Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile in children : An Emerging Infections Network survey. / Kociolek, Larry Kenneth; Kutty, Preeta K.; Polgreen, Philip M.; Beekmann, Susan E.

In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, Vol. 40, No. 3, 01.03.2019, p. 276-280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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