Heart rate: A risk factor for cancer?

Victoria Perskly*, Alan R. Dyer, Jolita Leonas, Jeremiah Stamler, David M. Berkson, Howard A. Lindberg, Oglesby Paul, Richard B. Shekelle, Mark H. Lepper, James A. Schoenberger

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

62 Scopus citations

Abstract

The relationship between heart rate and cancer mortality was examined in 3 Chicago epidemiologic studies: 1233 white men originally age 40-59 followed 18 years from the Chicago Peoples Gas Company study; 1899 white men originally age 40-55 followed 17 years from the Chicago Western Electric Company study; 5784 white men originally age 45-64 followed 5 years from the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry. There was a significant association between heart rate and cancer mortality in both univariate and muftivariate analyses in men from the Gas Company study and in men from the Chicago Heart Association study, but there was no association between heart rate and cancer mortality in men from the Western Electric study. The relationship persisted in the Gas Company study but not in the Chicago Heart Association study after eliminating deaths within the first 2 years of follow-up. With cancer deaths broken down by site, mortality from lung and colon cancer in the Gas Company study and mortality from lung cancer in the Chicago Heart Association study were significantly associated with baseline heart rate on univariate analysis and on bivarlate analysis controlling for age. Only colon cancer in the Gas Company, however, remained associated with heart rate when other variables were controlled. Thus, in 2 of the 3 studios examined, heart rate appeared to be an independent risk factor for cancer mortality in men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)477-487
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican journal of epidemiology
Volume114
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1981

Keywords

  • Death
  • Head rate
  • Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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