Heart rate variability and markers of inflammation and coagulation in depressed patients with coronary heart disease

Robert M. Carney*, Kenneth E. Freedland, Phyllis K. Stein, Gregory E. Miller, Brian Steinmeyer, Michael W. Rich, Stephen P. Duntley

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

72 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Depression is associated with an increased risk for cardiac morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysregulation, proinflammatory processes, and procoagulant processes have been suggested as possible explanations. Methods: Heart rate variability (HRV), an indicator of cardiac autonomic regulation, and markers of inflammation [C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)] and coagulation (fibrinogen) were assessed in 44 depressed patients with CHD. Results: Moderate, negative correlations were found between fibrinogen and four measures of HRV. IL-6 also negatively correlated with one measure of HRV (total power) and was marginally related to two others (very low frequency and low frequency power). Neither CRP nor TNF-α was significantly related to any measure of HRV. Conclusions: The finding that fibrinogen and IL-6 are moderately related to HRV suggests a link between these factors in depressed CHD patients. The relationship between ANS function and inflammatory and coagulant processes should be investigated in larger mechanistic studies of depression and cardiac morbidity and mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)463-467
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007

Keywords

  • Autonomic nervous system
  • Coagulation
  • Depression
  • Heart disease
  • Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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