Hematopoietic cell culture therapies (Part II): Clinical aspects and applications

Todd A. McAdams*, Jane N. Winter, William M. Miller, E. Terry Papoutsakis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High-dose chemotherapy, followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, holds significant promise for increasing the probability of long-term remission and possibly cure in a variety of cancers. Hematopoietic cell culture, or ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells, may play a significant role in reducing the danger and expense associated with the transplantation procedure. Phase I clinical trials have shown that ex vivo expanded cells have no significant toxicities, and some benefits. Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells is likely to find other applications in gene therapy, tumor purging, production of dendritic cells for immunotherapy and the production of mature blood cells for transfusion therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)388-396
Number of pages9
JournalTrends in biotechnology
Volume14
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Fingerprint

Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Cell culture
Cell Culture Techniques
Purging
Gene therapy
Chemotherapy
Stem cells
Toxicity
Tumors
Clinical Trials, Phase I
Blood
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Cells
Blood Transfusion
Genetic Therapy
Immunotherapy
Dendritic Cells
Blood Cells
Neoplasms
Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

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Hematopoietic cell culture therapies (Part II) : Clinical aspects and applications. / McAdams, Todd A.; Winter, Jane N.; Miller, William M.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry.

In: Trends in biotechnology, Vol. 14, No. 10, 01.01.1996, p. 388-396.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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