High levels of antibodies to the cd4 binding domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 glycoprotein 120 are associated with faster disease progression

Peter C. Chien, Sandra Cohen, Cynthia Kleeberger, Janis Giorgi, John Phair, Susan Zolla-Pazner, Catarina E. Hioe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human monoclonal antibodies (Abs) to the CD4 binding domain of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 glycoprotein (gp) 120 (gp120CD4bd) inhibit gp120 presentation to gp120-specific T helper (Th) cells. Since Th responses are critical to control HIV, anti-gp120CD4bd Abs could be involved in HIV pathogenesis. Therefore, anti-gp120CD4bd Ab levels were compared in serum samples from matched pairs of HIV-positive rapid progressors (RPs) and slow progressors (SPs). Many RPs had higher levels of anti-gp120CD4bd Abs than their corresponding SPs. However, Ab levels to whole gp120 and to its C5 domain were similar. Hence, the higher levels of anti-gp120CD4bd Abs detected in the serum of RPs do not reflect generalized increases in Ab levels to whole gp120. Moreover, anti-gp120CD4bd Ab levels correlated with the amount of inhibition of gp120-specific Th proliferation in the presence of respective serum immunoglobulin G. These findings document a novel mechanism of HIV pathogenesis mediated by anti-gp120CD4bd Abs exhibiting suppressive activity on gp120 presentation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-213
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume186
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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