High rates of surveillance imaging for treated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: Findings from a large national database

Gregory A. Abel*, Ann Vanderplas, Maria A. Rodriguez, Allison L. Crosby, Myron S. Czuczman, Joyce C. Niland, Leo I. Gordon, Michael Millenson, Andrew D. Zelenetz, Jonathan W. Friedberg, Ann S. Lacasce

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

We aimed to characterize surveillance imaging and circumstances of relapse for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Outcomes Database, a prospective cohort study collecting clinical and outcome data at seven comprehensive cancer centers. Patients presenting with newly diagnosed DLBCL in remission ≥3 months after initial therapy and who had accrued 2 years of follow-up were eligible for analysis (n 625). The median number of imaging studies was 2.5/year (institutional range 0.53.5, p < 0.0001); 48.4% received only dedicated computed tomography (CT) scans, 14.6% received only positron emission tomography (PET)-inclusive modalities, 32.8% received a combination and 4.2% received no imaging. Among all eligible patients, 50 (8.0%) experienced relapse, and approximately one-quarter of subclinical relapses were detected through routine imaging. Our results suggest that despite limited data regarding its effect on outcomes, surveillance imaging is prevalent in DLBCL, and a majority of patients receive PET scans at some point during follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1113-1116
Number of pages4
JournalLeukemia and Lymphoma
Volume53
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

Keywords

  • Diagnostic imaging
  • Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma
  • Health services research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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