High-responsivity GaInAs/InP quantum well infrared photodetectors grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

Matthew Erdtmann*, Anthony Matlis, Christopher Jelen, Manijeh Razeghi, Gail Brown

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

We have studied the dependence of the well doping density in n-type GaInAs/InP quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (LP-MOCVD). Three identical GaInAs/InP QWIP structures were grown with well sheet carrier densities of 1×1011 cm-2, 3×1011 cm-2, and 10×1011 cm-2; all three samples had very sharp spectral responses at λ = 9.0 μm. We find that there is a large sensitivity of responsivity, dark current, noise current, and detectivity with the well doping density. Measurements revealed that the lowest-doped sample had an extremely low responsivity relative to the doping concentration while the highest-doped sample had an excessively high dark current relative to doping. The middle-doped sample yielded the optimal results. This QWIP had a responsivity of 33.2 A/W and operated with a detectivity of 3.5×1010 cmHz1/2W-1 at a bias of 0.75 V and temperature of 80 K. This responsivity is the highest value reported for any QWIP in the λ = 8-9 μm range. Analysis is also presented explaining the dependence of the measured QWlP parameters to well doping density.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220-226
Number of pages7
JournalProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume3948
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
EventPhotodetectors: Materials and Devices V - San Jose, CA, USA
Duration: Jan 25 2000Jan 28 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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