HIV and AIDS risk behaviors among female jail detainees: Implications for public health policy

Gary Michael McClelland, Linda A. Teplin*, Karen M. Abram, Naomi Jacobs

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

68 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. We examined the sexual and injection drug use HIV and AIDS risk behaviors of female jail detainees. Methods. The sample (n = 948) was stratified by charge type (felony vs misdemeanor) and race/ethnicity (African American, non-Hispanic White, Hispanic, other). Results. Non-Hispanic White women, women arrested for less serious charges, women who had prior arrests, women arrested on drug charges, and women with severe mental disorders were at especially high risk for sexual and injection drug transmission of HIV and AIDS. Conclusions. Many women at risk for HIV and AIDS - women who use drugs, women who trade sex for money or drugs, homeless women, and women with mental disorders - eventually will cycle through jail. Because most jail detainees return to their communities within days, providing HIV and AIDS education in jail must become a public health priority.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)818-825
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume92
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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