HIV-related enacted stigma and increase frequency of depressive symptoms among Thai and Cambodian adolescents and young adults with perinatal HIV

on behalf of the PREDICT Resilience study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

HIV-related enacted stigma and social problems may increase risk for depression and/or behavioral problems among adolescents and young adults with perinatal HIV(AYA-PHIV), yet few studies have explored stigma in AYA-PHIV residing in low-to-middle income regions, including Southeast Asia. We assessed HIV-related enacted stigma and social problems in AYA-PHIV who participated in the RESILIENCE study (clinicaltrials.gov identification: U19AI53741) in Thailand and Cambodia using specific questions during structured in-person interviews. Depression was measured by the Child Depression Inventory for children <15 years, or the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scales for youth ≥15 years); behavioral problems were measured by the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL-caregiver report). Among 195 AYA-PHIV (median age 16.9 years), 25.6% reported a lifetime experience of enacted stigma, while 10.8% experienced social problems due to HIV infection. The frequency of depressive symptoms was nearly two-fold higher among AYA-PHIV with compared to those without HIV-related enacted stigma (34.7% vs. 16.0%, p = 0.005). Caregiver-reported behavioral problems were detected in 14.6% of all AYA-PHIV, with no differences between those with and without HIV-related enacted stigma. Low household income and caregiver mental health problems were independent risk factors for depressive symptoms; HIV-related enacted stigma was also associated with increased risk, warranting targeted services to support AYA-PHIV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-256
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of STD and AIDS
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • behavioral problem
  • depressive symptoms
  • enacted stigma
  • perinatal HIV infection
  • young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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