HIV testing beliefs in a predominantly hispanic community health center during the routine HIV testing era: Does english language ability matter?

Monisha Arya*, Amber B. Amspoker, Naina Lalani, Beverly Patuwo, Michael Kallen, Richard Street, Kasisomayajula Viswanath, Thomas P. Giordano

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Hispanic population in the U.S. carries a disproportionate burden of HIV. Despite the high prevalence of HIV, many Hispanics remain untested for HIV. The purpose of this study conducted in a predominantly Hispanic-serving community health center in a high HIV prevalence area was to understand patient beliefs of who should be tested for HIV in the routine HIV testing era. Survey participants were presented with nine populations of people that should be tested for HIV based on CDC HIV testing recommendations. Of the 90 participants (67.1% Hispanic) who answered the HIV testing beliefs question, only approximately 45% were aware that all adults and teenagers should be HIV tested. Only 30% correctly identified all nine populations of people that should be tested for HIV based on CDC HIV testing recommendations. Our study suggests that Hispanics are either unaware of or disagree with the latest CDC recommendations for routine HIV testing of all persons ages 13-64 in high HIV prevalence areas. Improving knowledge of the current HIV epidemiologic profile in the U.S. and the most recent routine HIV testing recommendations may improve HIV testing rates in Hispanic communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-44
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS patient care and STDs
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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