Home health care for children with medical complexity: Workforce gaps, policy, and future directions

Carolyn Christine Foster*, Rishi K Agrawal, Matthew Mason Davis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

With the medical and surgical advances of recent decades, a growing proportion of children rely on home-based care for daily health monitoring and care tasks. However, a dearth of available home health care providers with pediatric training to serve children and youth with medical complexity markedly limits the current capacity of home health care to meet the needs of patients and their families. In this article we analyze the workforce gaps, payment models, and policy challenges unique to home health care for children and youth with medical complexity, including legal challenges brought by families because of home nursing shortages. We propose a portfolio of solutions to address the current failures, including payment reform, improved coordination of services and pediatric home health training through partnerships with child-focused health systems, telehealth-enabled opportunities to bridge current workforce gaps, and the better alignment of pediatric care with the needs of adult-focused long-term services and supports.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)987-993
Number of pages7
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

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Home Care Services
Delivery of Health Care
Pediatrics
Home Nursing
Telemedicine
Health Personnel
Direction compound
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

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