Home Oxygen Therapy for Bronchiolitis: An Evaluation of the Primary Care Providers’ Experience at Sea Level

Erin E. Dunbar*, Michelle Lea Macy, James A. Cranford, Nicole Sroufe, Marie Lozon, Marisa C. Louie

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite 90% of primary care providers at altitude reporting experience with home oxygen therapy for hypoxemic, otherwise well infants, its use at sea level is not well described. Our objective was to understand experience with home oxygen at sea level and determine potential barriers and benefits of its use. We surveyed all pediatricians and family medicine providers within a 30-mile radius of our pediatric hospital from May 2016 to December 2016. Forty-three percent of providers responded. Few (8%) had any experience with home oxygen therapy for bronchiolitis. When all responders were asked about potential benefits and barriers, they reported less disruption of family routines and reduced cost as the largest potential benefits, and lack of parental comfort the largest barrier. Despite their concerns, 53% of providers felt that home oxygen use would not substantially affect their practice. Our results identify a need for education before using this alternative to admission in our center.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1304-1309
Number of pages6
JournalClinical pediatrics
Volume57
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Keywords

  • bronchiolitis
  • home oxygen therapy
  • primary care provider
  • sea level

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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