Hospital variation in rates of concurrent fundoplication during gastrostomy enteral access procedures

Anne Stey*, Charles D. Vinocur, R. Lawrence Moss, Bruce L. Hall, Mark E. Cohen, Kari Kraemer, Clifford Y. Ko, Brian D. Kenney, Loren Berman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to determine whether (1) the propensity for concurrent fundoplication during gastrostomy varies among hospitals, and (2) postoperative morbidity differs among institutions performing fundoplication more or less frequently. Methods: Children who underwent gastrostomy with or without concurrent fundoplication were identified in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric (ACS-NSQIP-P). A hierarchical multivariate regression modeled the excess effects that hospitals exerted over propensity for concurrent fundoplication adjusting for preoperative clinical variables. Hospitals were designated as low outliers (significantly lower-adjusted odds of concurrent fundoplication than the average hospital with similar patient mix), average hospitals, and high outliers based on their risk-adjusted concurrent fundoplication practice. The postoperative morbidity rates were compared among low-outlier, average, and high-outlier hospitals. Results: Between 2011 and 2013, 3775 children underwent gastrostomy at one of 54 ACS-NSQIP-P participating hospitals. The mean hospital concurrent fundoplication rate was 11.7% (range 0–64%). There was no significant difference in unadjusted morbidity rate in children with concurrent fundoplication, 11.0% compared to 9.7% in children without concurrent fundoplication. After controlling for clinical variables, 8 hospitals were identified as low outliers (fundoplication rate of 0.4%) and 16 hospitals were identified as high outliers (fundoplication rate of 34.6%). The average unadjusted morbidity rate among hospitals with low, average, and high odds of concurrent fundoplication were 9.6, 10.6, and 8.4%, respectively. Conclusion: Hospitals vary significantly in propensity for concurrent fundoplication during gastrostomy yet postoperative morbidity does not differ significantly among institutions performing fundoplication more or less frequently.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2201-2211
Number of pages11
JournalSurgical endoscopy
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Keywords

  • Fundoplication
  • Hospital variation
  • Pediatric surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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