Hospitalizations for intussusception before and after the reintroduction of rotavirus vaccine in the United States

Joseph S. Zickafoose*, Brian D. Benneyworth, Meredith P. Riebschleger, Claudia M. Espinosa, Matthew M. Davis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether hospital discharges for intussusception in children younger than 1 year have changed since the reintroduction of rotavirus vaccine in the United States. Design: Serial cross-sectional analysis. Setting: US hospitals. Participants: Children younger than 1 year with a discharge diagnosis of intussusception identified in the Kids' Inpatient Database, a series of nationally representative data sets of pediatric hospital discharges in the United States with 4 available years prior to vaccine reintroduction (1997, 2000, 2003, and 2006) and 1 year after (2009). Main Exposures: Hospital discharge before vs after rotavirus vaccine reintroduction. Outcome Measures: Total number and rate of hospital discharges for infants younger than 1 year with a diagnosis of intussusception (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code 560.0). Results: From 1997 to 2006, there was no change in the total number of hospital discharges for intussusception, with a small decrease in the rate of intussusception discharges (41.6 [95% CI, 36.7-46.5] to 36.5 [95% CI, 31.7-41.2] per 100 000 infants). Based on the trend, the predicted rate of discharges for intussusception in 2009 was 36.0 (95% CI, 30.2-41.8) per 100 000 infants. The measured rate of hospital discharges for intussusception in 2009 was 33.3 (95% CI, 29.0-37.6) per 100 000 infants. Conclusion: The reintroduction of rotavirus vaccine since 2006 has not resulted in a detectable increase in the number of hospital discharges for intussusception among US infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)350-355
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume166
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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