Hostility, anger, and marital adjustment: Concurrent and prospective associations with psychosocial vulnerability

Kelly Glazer Baron, Timothy W. Smith*, Jonathan Butner, Jill Nealey-Moore, Melissa W. Hawkins, Bert N. Uchino

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

82 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hostility may contribute to risk for disease through psychosocial vulnerability, including the erosion of the quality of close relationships. This study examined hostility, anger, concurrent ratings of the relationship, and change in marital adjustment over 18 months in 122 married couples. Wives' and husbands' hostility and anger were related to concurrent ratings of marital adjustment and conflict. In prospective analyses, wives' but not husbands' hostility and anger were related to change in marital adjustment. In hierarchical regression and SEM models wives' anger was a unique predictor of both wives' and husbands' change in marital adjustment. The association between wives' anger and change in husbands' marital satisfaction was mediated by husbands' ratings of conflict in the marriage. These results support the role of hostility and anger in the development of psychosocial vulnerability, but also suggest an asymmetry in the effects of wives' and husbands' trait anger and hostility on marital adjustment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007

Keywords

  • Anger
  • Hostility
  • Marital adjustment
  • Psychosocial vulnerability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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