How do classroom behaviors predict longitudinal reading achievement? A conditional autoregressive latent growth analysis

Xiaodan Tang*, Ting Dai

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Elementary students’ ability to regulate classroom behavior is believed to play an important role in their reading ability. To date, there is some evidence articulating this relationship, but much of the research has not addressed how classroom behavior may predict the longitudinal reading achievement. The present study used data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study—Kindergarten Class of 2010–2011 to examine the associations of self-control, attentional focusing, and externalizing problem behaviors with reading development for elementary students from kindergarten through fourth grade. A combination of the latent growth model and the autoregressive model – the Autoregressive Latent Trajectory model is applied to describe children's increasing but later leveling off reading growth. Results from the Autoregressive Latent Trajectory model conditional on classroom behaviors show that they have a mix of positive and negative associations with reading growth. Further, a multigroup analysis reveals the gender differences in such associations. Implications for educators, researchers and policy makers are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-251
Number of pages13
JournalEarly Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume54
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2021

Keywords

  • Autoregressive
  • Classroom behavior
  • Latent growth model
  • Reading growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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