How do right-to-carry laws affect crime rates? Coping with ambiguity using bounded-variation assumptions

Charles F. Manski, John V. Pepper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite dozens of studies, research on crime has struggled to reach consensus about the impact of right-to-carry (RTC) gun laws. With this in mind, we formalize and apply a class of bounded-variation assumptions that flexibly restrict the degree to which outcomes may vary across time and space. Using these assumptions, we present empirical analysis of the effect of RTC laws on violent and property crimes in Virginia, Maryland, and Illinois. Imposing specific assumptions that we believe worthy of consideration, we find that RTC laws increase some crimes, decrease other crimes, and have effects that vary over time for others.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)232-244
Number of pages13
JournalReview of Economics and Statistics
Volume100
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Economics and Econometrics

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